Now we’re on to text mining

Text mining is the next type of data analysis that we’re looking at in the Data, Analytics and Learning MOOC. I’m looking forward to the next couple of weeks, as I think that some of these tools and techniques might be useful for my research project, which is based on analysing tweets. Text mining is all about trying to find patterns in large collections of text, and using these patterns as a basis for identifying data that is worth investigating further. It’s this finding patterns in textual data which interests me, as that’s the vision that I’ve got for my Twitter research project.

One of the subareas of text mining is analysing the collaborative learning process that occurs in online courses via the discussion forums. This analysis involves modelling conversational interactions between students , and using those models to find out what it is about conversations that make them valuable for online learning. Based on this understanding it’s then possible to design interventions to support learning in online settings. Analysing conversations in online courses draws on knowledge from a number of fields, such as education, psychology, and sociolinguistics. This knowledge is used to determine the cognitive processes associated with collaborative learning, investigate what conversational interactions look like, and build models of how psychological signals are revealed through language. All this ultimately allows the development of models showing where processes are happening during interactions.

An example of how these models can be used in learning analytics research is assessing some reasons for attrition along the way in MOOCs. The models are based on the analysis of the posts in discussion forums, both from the point of view of individual students and from the overall tone of individual threads. The negativity and positivity of the posts and threads is calculated, and then survival modeling is carried out to determine the probability that a student will have dropped out of the course by the following week.

This sort of detailed modeling is out of scope for my research project, but some of the aspects of conversation analysis could be useful, as many of the interactions between Twitter users could be characterised as conversations. At this stage I think I’ll be learning some useful stuff over the next couple of weeks.

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About Andrew

I'm a health librarian in Sydney, Australia, who also happens to be a geocacher.

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